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By Karley Glover/LHHS Journalism Student:

In 1957, Linda Mowery moved to Lake Havasu City when the city was still known as Site Six. “We turned down a dirt road that was like a roller coaster leading to Site Six,” Mowery said.

Linda Mowery’s mother working in the far back in the Site Six diner. photo courtesy Linda Mowery

After moving to Site Six, Linda frequently helped her mother in the Site Six Diner, where she served Robert McCulloch and his friends, who would give her tips for bringing him his fish dinner. “He’d say, ‘Wow Linda I just love your color,’ because my face was green from those fish eyes staring up at me,” Mowery said.  

In 1968, her family moved to Kingman, however, she continued to visit Lake Havasu for vacations and summers, until she moved back.

Linda first went to school to be a Licensed Nurse’s Assistant (LNA) in 1969, and she graduated in 1970. After working in Kingman for a period of time, she moved back to Lake Havasu in 1984, where she began working at Havasu Regional Medical Center (HRMC) and in 1985 as an Emergency Room (ER) technician.

Linda Mowery’s family lived in a trailer at Site Six when first moving to Lake Havasu. photo courtesy Linda Mowery

She worked in the ER for 16 years until transferring to the outpatient surgery department where she currently resides. She has worked at the Lake Havasu hospital for a total 32 years.

“I have grown with the hospital,” Mowery said. She has seen many changes, such as ownership changes and expansions.

While an LNA doesn’t have the responsibilities of a nurse, one does a variety of tasks to aid nurses, doctors and her fellow LNA’s. “I love what I do because I have more patient contact than a nurse,” Mowery said.  

Linda Mowery. photo Jillian Danielson/RiverScene

Some of Mowery’s everyday responsibilities include; transporting patients, sanitizing and preparing rooms, preparing patients for surgery and helping nurses and doctors anyway she can.

Linda has always loved medicine, even as a little girl. She would bring home animals when she was a child and doctor them and take care of her family members when they were ill. Now, as an adult, she cares for strangers.

From putting bandaids on her pet chicken as a child, to putting bandaids on her real patients, Mowery still continues to offer help to anyone, or anything, in need.

Site Six Diner in the early Havasu days. photo courtesy Linda Mowery

1 COMMENT

  1. I really enjoyed seeing the article about Linda Mowery and her memories of old Site 6 as my grandparents, “Doc” & Jewel Young also moved to Site 6 in 1957 and worked in the old Mess Hall. I also was there during the summers and holiday vacations from school in 1957 through 1965, so although I don’t recall Linda Mowery as I was just a youngster at the time myself but her mother may have remembered my grandparents from those early days? I would have liked to talk to her more about the Site 6 experience?

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